Saturday, 27 June 2015

Idiot anaesthesiologist

Several people emailed this story to me shortly after it broke, and someone posted a link to it as a comment on a previous post, so I feel like you overbearing people have harassed me into writing about it.  Ok, that's not exactly accurate - the truth is that as soon as I read this story, I knew I had to write about it.  Fortunately my editor at The Daily Beast agreed that it's an insane story and gave me the green light immediately.  I don't think I have anything additional to say that I didn't say in the article, so feel free to read all about it here.

So now you all can make your comments here and STOP OFF-TOPIC COMMENTING ON OTHER POSTS, DAMN IT.

22 comments:

  1. Hey, doc, it was me who posted the link.

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    1. If that's true then you posted as "Anonymous" because you knew you had worn out your welcome and were near being banned.

      You've been warned for the last time.

      Delete
  2. It is time to inquire about the assigned anesthesiologist prior to surgery. Most of the time you don't meet him until it is time to be put under.

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    1. For all the surgeries I had (all scheduled), I met the anesthesiologist the day before, where I they asked me questions about my medical history, explained to me what kind of anesthesia I was getting and what risks were involved, and I had to sign that I would not sue them if they damaged my teeth in the process (more or less, it's been a while).

      The way this lady acted is unacceptable. I get that especially the people involved in performing surgery (surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses) are under a lot of pressure, they need to keep up concentration continuously, sometimes for many hours without break. Any slip can cause a patient to die. They, understandably need to vent. When I lie on the table and I am about to black out, I absolutely expect the doctors to make small talk, talk about their weekends, their families and also about me. I also expect to be joked about. But I sure don't expect to be degraded and called names. And I trust any diagnosis to be as accurate as possible.

      This doctor acted like a bully and honestly I'm quite disgusted by how she behaved. I would expect someone with an academic education to use a more refined language and act professionally while working.

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    2. Every time I've had surgery I don't think I met the anesthesiologist until I was in the room about to be put under. It was just a quick "This is Dr. X, s/he's going to be pumping you full of drugs today. Night night". I have never thought to inquire about them and I didn't know it was even a separate job until I had surgery for the first time. It's kind of how you don't think about asking who keeps the air conditioning maintained in the building during summer (which is arguably the most important job in the world if you live in 100+ degree temps everyday like I do). I just sort of assume things will be running smoothly, and I don't think about them unless they don't.

      I'm not too concerned about the jokes said between a few colleagues. He'll get over his hurt feelings. I'm more concerned that they would falsify a diagnosis, and then deliberately not follow protocol by not meeting with him afterwards to talk about the procedure and next steps. They sounded pretty comfortable doing it too, that it's probably not the first patient they brushed off who could still have had a legit problem, just not in the colon. That can actually do real damage to someone outside of making them "feel sad" enough to need money as solace.

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    3. I should clarify, I agree with you. I just never thought to ask about the anesthesiologist before this is what I was trying to say.

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    4. When I had a colonoscopy I was introduced to both the gastroenterologist and anesthesiologist while I was lying pantsless on the exam table in a hospital gown. Right before he started the propofal the anesthetist said you will feel a little warmth. That's all I remember until I woke up. Both doctors were gone and a nurse asked what I wanted to drink. I had a cup of tea, was given a sheet of paper with aftercare instructions and a picture of my cecum and sent on my way. According to the paper they were in and out in under 10 minutes. I had to ask the nurse how it went. Most outpatient endoscopy centers are like an assembly line. By the time I came too the doctors had moved on to the next patient. This was a large, university affiliated practice.

      I asked if they found anything and the nurse said no which was curious since a different doctor in the practice had already diagnosed a small polyp previously which he chose to leave alone. He was the guy who referred me to the gastroenterologist. I told the nurse this and she acted surprised. A few days later I got a follow up call at home asking if I was satisfied with my experience. I had no complaints but I did mention again being surprised the doctor had missed the polyp. She said they'd have to look over my records and get back to me. When she called back they wanted me to come back in so they could remove the polyp free of charge. I declined because the other doctor didn't seem too concerned about it. I only mentioned it because I thought it was weird that the second guy completely missed it. I guess when you're in and out in 10 minutes things like that happen.

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  3. one wonders if he was that bad a patient or she was that bad a professional. I've dealt with some problem patients who had the potential to induce this sort of response in a person who wasn't at the peak of their game.

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    1. I've worked customer service for a fraction of what she makes. We all remained professional on the clock even with the customers who were throwing a tantrum. We just went out of our way to make the nice people happy.

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    2. I do my best for every customer, regardless of what capacity I am working in. however, I have also had comments to make about customers after the fact in the privacy of the dayroom. of course, I've also had a few comments about paramedics. usually the new ones who are still trying to get the patient to be comparable to the textbook.

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    3. If one jokes about a patient then the doctor breached an ethical standard. The only reason this came to light is it was taped. TX is one of the few states that has cameras and voice everywhere in a hospital. More states are moving towards this idea to preserve the record of events.

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    4. everyone who deals with other people will ultimately have some form of comment to make about another person. it doesn't matter whether you are the leader of the free world or the number three french fry dunker. the only reasonable standard is to require that the comments made not be able to be traced back to the subject. to try to prohibit comments altogether is to doom a lot of people to very short careers.

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    5. Still actionable Ken.

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  4. The troll is still befouling the last Jahi entry.

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    1. I am aware. Please keep comments on topic.

      Delete
  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. What does this have to do with this topic?

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  6. I've woken up during procedures three times. I woke up one time when they were putting a shunt in my arm saying "Ow, ow, ow!" and the doc told me to shut up. I needed another sugery a couple of months later and wouldn't have him as the surgeon. I don't feel so bad about that now.

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  7. Thanks so much! I'm having oral surgery tomorrow....

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  8. Saying such vile things while someone is sedated is the cherry on the sh t cupcake. Falsifying a medical record is the worst part about this situation and I hope it leads to even more serious consequences. The horrible things said about the patient is utterly stupid because there are times when a patient is NOT out and under and could hear what is being said. Of course it's even better that he had it recorded.

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  9. The records were not falsified. There was a statement to place something into the record yet it did not occur. This was a straight up defamation per case. The taping was legal, one party state. The doctor was an idiot. The patient had every right to sue. Thankfully they used and the doctor was let go from her practice. She can be up for now ethical violations and possible HIPAA violations. However it is a weak argument to sue on HIPAA violation since HIPAA does not directly allow suit by the patient that is why the strongest argument was defamation where he suffered emotional distress.

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